How does genetically engineering fruit and shoot borer (FSB) resistance into brinjal help farmers and consumers?

Currently, farmers use labour-intensive practices to control FSB such as the prompt manual removal of wilted shoots. The trapping of male moths using pheromones to prevent mating and the use of nylon netting is also done to protect the plants. These efforts are usually insufficient, thereby forcing farmers to rely heavily on insecticide sprays to control FSB. However, FSB is only vulnerable to sprays for a few hours before it bores into the plant, forcing farmers to spray insecticides as often as every 2-3 days. Intensive use of insecticides poses a serious threat to human health and the environment. Heavy use of pesticide sprays also adds to the cost of production. With Bt brinjal, the farmers will gain increased productivity, profits and health benefits while the consumers will get access to pesticide-free safer fruits. The increased productivity will help to maintain low prices for the consumer while the farmers will gain from higher marketable yields.